My years of genealogical research has revealed hundreds of ancestors branching nicely into a well-formed tree. I have unfolded often astonishing discoveries of many grandfathers with surnames unknown to our family before my quest. But I recently reflected on the information known of the lineage of my birth name: Capps.

In genealogy, it is easy to stray off onto wild adventures of various ancestors as our attention is distracted by interesting discoveries, far away from our original point. But this week I swung back to my original point, concentrating on the Capps lineage.

My research had gone back to a Thomas Capps, born approximately 1735 in North Carolina. Not much light has been shed on Thomas Capps; few documents have unsurfaced. But as I stared at Thomas' name, I wondered who might have come before him.

As you progress backwards in your research, moving toward the colonial years, the population was small compared to today. And many living at that time were our original ancestors in the new world.

Knowing that few men with the Capps surname would be living in North Carolina in the early1700's, I played a little game that has brought me good luck in the past: I placed Capps in the Ancestry.com search engine with a location of North Carolina and approximate birth of 1700.

And instantly, the name William Capps popped up as an immigrant into North Carolina in 1702. Now obviously this man was born prior to 1700 but I was astounded with evidence of several noted documents for research, one being "Some Pioneers of North Carolina, 1674-1701."

Bingo! I may very well have uncovered the original immigrant of the Capps lineage into North Carolina. And the most chilling part of this little treasure is my possible colonial ancestor of the Capps family, carries the same name of my grandfather: William Capps. He is even listed on one passenger list as Will; the name my grandfather went by.

Is my discovery a proven fact to my lineage?
Of course not; at least not yet. But it is a starting point for further digging on a lineage that I have shamelessly neglected for some time.

And so I have gone back to the basics and revisited my original point. Because no matter how far you stray, the original point is closest to home.

And there is no place like home.

Keep searching for answers,

Cheryl
 


Comments


Comments are closed.